• Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 2,447 other followers

  • Become a Fan


  • Archives

  • Build a Willow Lodge with your Son Day October 28

    For parents looking for a spiritual activity to engage boys next weekend, the Boys Mentorship Collaborative has a way to keep them busy. On Sunday, October 28 between 1 -4 pm parents and their sons are invited to work together to weave willow a lodge. Once built, the participants will join under the lodge to hear a Rite of Passage story, the passage of birth, as presented by midwife Kate Saumweber Hogan. The event is intended for boys ages 3 through 14; boys under age 10 must be accompanied by a parent. Cost is a sliding scale of $20-$40.

     

    10/25/12 Revisions made 10:24 pm to reflect correct name and day for organization and event.

    Free Chronic Illness Management Workshop – Friday 7pm, Oct 12th

     

    Sherry L.M. Merriam, a Pagan and a therapist serving the Twin Cities Pagan Community at Franklin Family Services is offering a FREE workshop:    Take Back Your Health:  Power Tools for People with Chronic Illness, Their Caregivers, and Health Care Providers.

    When: Friday, October 12, 2012, 7 PM to 8:30 PM

    Location: Adler Graduate School – 1550 East 78th Street, Richfield, MN 55423

     People with chronic illness and their care providers frequently feel dis-empowered – even helpless – when facing an ongoing medical condition or pain.  This workshop will provide participants with empowerment through encouragement and practical tools to manage any health condition. Please register for free online .

    Sherry Merriam has offered presentations of interest to Pagans at Paganicon, MARScon, CONvergence, and Minicon.

    Standing Stones Mabon – Interview

    I had the honor to attend the Coven of the Standing Stones community Mabon celebration last weekend. This is a private, by invitation event, but those for whom it is needed, or appropriate for, always seem to find an invitation (or you can ask for one). If you ask; “What is this coven known for?” , most would say they excel in the ‘craft’ of the Craft, they put together a solid ritual experience. They are the most welcoming group you will find, and take pride in their diversity and inclusiveness.  Standing Stones has been supportive of many community groups and events over the years, particularly helping the local Covenant of the Goddess raise needed funds for survival a few years back, and ongoing help cleaning the highway with the Upper Midwest Pagan Alliance (UMPA) and raising funds for that group. If you can’t find them at Magus Books offering free classes, look wherever you see Pagan community growing and they are likely somewhere involved!

    Standing Stones is a coven of leaders.  I got a chance to corner three of the most visible. Don, John, and Tamara, and ask some questions.

    How long have you been doing a community Mabon?
    John: This is the eighth year we have held this event as a community Mabon.

    How many folks do you have attending?
    John:  By our count, close to 120. A pretty good turnout! It’s a large family.

    This slideshow requires JavaScript.

    Why do you hold this event?
    John:  It is a way we give back to our community. By giving back some of our bounty, we help build our community. Our community gives to us and we have to give something back.

    We started inviting our community to celebrate Mabon with us about eight years ago. About 70 people attended. Some in our community have been at every one. We feel honored by that. We used to hold both a community Ostara and a Mabon, because we liked honoring the balance of light and dark at both times of the year. But they got so large and came up so quickly that we decided it was best to just offer one. We picked Mabon because it is a time of abundance. We thought, let’s feed everybody and pick a time when we can all be outside and enjoy some great weather.

    Continue reading

    Coldwater Spring – The New History

    Coldwater Spring is being replanted tomorrow (see Paganistan Weekly below), and how can restoration not be a great thing?  How this sacred place has gotten to its current condition, a bulldozed and denuded site, ready for the National Park Service (NPS), to “restore” is a very long story.  Susu Jeffrey tells it better than most anyone, and her recent article in the  “Southside Pride” community newspaper gives you an update (reprinted in full at bottom). There remains an ongoing struggle to have this site declared, as the Minnesota Historical Society supports, a Dakota traditional sacred site,  a “Traditional Cultural Property (TCP)”.
    About Saturday’s NPS restoration event. Susu adds:

    The National Park Service told the Mendota Mdewakanton Dakota Community that they could not hold a pipe ceremony on opening day at Coldwater Park, Saturday, September 1, 2012. The community held a pipe ceremony anyway while the National Park Service brought in an armed man in a bullet proof vest. People considered this disrespectful at a sacred site. The park service refuses to honor the Traditional Cultural Property/sacred designation at Coldwater.The National Park Service clearcut most of Coldwater and now wants volunteers to plant toothpick trees where NPS wants new trees. NPS has solicited donations for new trees: $1,000 for a dozen; $100 for one tree. It’s an extremely dry year for new trees.  Survival is iffy.

    Other Coldwater Spring events:

    Offerings for the Sacred Spring on the Harvest Full Moon, Saturday, September 29, 2012

    Gather at the entrance to Coldwater Springs, 7 PM – This is a crafty, child friendly gathering.

    Native elders have asked people to leave offerings  “for the ancestors” at Coldwater. We will make natural offerings from the beautiful “weeds” around the front gates. The federally recognized Lower Sioux Indian Community Council declared Coldwater a Traditional Cultural Property and “sacred” in 2006. Unfortunately the National Park Service refuses to acknowledge Coldwater Springs as a sacred site for Native Americans and others.

    Traditional group howl!  Full Moon celebrations at Coldwater have been observed every month since 2000.

    Sunset 6:56 PM (55-minutes earlier than last full moon) Moonrise 6:27 PM (1-hour, 6-minutes earlier)

    Solstice 2003 at Coldwater Spring

    DIRECTIONS: Coldwater Springs is between Minnehaha Park & Fort Snelling, in Minneapolis, just North of the Hwy 55/62 interchange. From Hwy 55/Hiawatha, turn East (toward the Mississippi) at 54th Street, take an immediate right, & drive South on the frontage road for ½-mile past the parking meters, through the cul-de-sac and into Coldwater to park free.

    This gathering is free and open to all. Note: This is not a “special event” since the National Park Service is not issuing any special use permits for Coldwater Springs until late spring of 2013. Info: http://www.friendsofcoldwater.org

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Continue reading

    Candidate Gary Johnson Announces Debate Exclusion Civil Suits at Macalester College

    Gary Johnson, Libertarian candidate for President, appeared yesterday at Macalester College, Kagin Commons,  in Saint Paul, MN.  Organized by Macalester Young Americans for Liberty, there were approximately 200 interested voters attending, a mix of mainly students and  “third-party” supporters.  In a brief interview with PNC-MN as he left for the airport, Gary Johnson announced he had just learned he was officially excluded from the upcoming  Presidential Debates. He stated his campaign already had plans to file lawsuits in at least three states to contest the ruling.  Civil suits were reportedly filed late yesterday against both major parties and the Commission on Presidential Debates  based on violations of the Sherman Anti-Trust Act, which prohibits monopolistic practices.

    Opening the afternoon was Murphy’s Midnight Rounders, a local folk pagan band, who were well received by the crowd. They played two songs with “hemp” themes which got a rise from supporters of the Grassroots Party , Libertarians,  and other groups who support decriminalization of recreational drugs.

    Andrew Ojeda, a Macalester undergraduate running for office  in district 64A as a Republican, and Ms Yer Lor, a representative from “Minnesotans United for All Families” , both gave opening remarks. Lor implored Minnesotans to defeat the marriage amendment. Several local Pagans are supporters of this group,  and the group was active soliciting signatures at Twin Cities Pagan Pride.

    During the band performance Gary Johnson slipped into the audience front row, to little notice from the sizable media contingent present. Later, as former Governor Jesse Ventura arrived and sat near the PNC-MN contingent, the main stream media all shifted to front stage, to get shots of the colorful former wrestler in his Jimi Hendrix  T-shirt. It appeared main stream media saw the story as Ventura’s appearance and implication of a 2016 run for President as the prime story over the visit of an existing candidate, polling 6% nationally at this point, Gary Johnson.

    This slideshow requires JavaScript.

    Ventura spoke next and praised Johnson’s efforts as a third-party candidate, and for his Libertarian, fiscally conservative but socially liberal, views.  He suggested Presidential candidates should be required to wear “NASCAR style suits”, with “patches from all their biggest donors, their biggest bribers” .  He said voters  should know, “Who owns them, who has bought them off?”  Ventura encouraged young Libertarians to fight for a constitutional amendment to remove a corporations ‘personhood”,  from having rights of free speech and spending in political campaigns. He said the American political system was threatened as long as unlimited and undisclosed money can flow into political campaigns. He tells people who say a third-party candidate vote is wasted that  “a vote for a Democrat or Republican is a wasted vote, because you are going to get the same thing. ” He encouraged the audience to support free speech even if the content it is not popular, because  the  protection is there to protect unpopular speech. He chided main stream media as being controlled by four major corporations, and no longer a  “watch dog’” of the three branches of government. While he personally is not a technology or even a cell phone user, Ventura supported the internet as the last place where the “truth” can get out, saying, “Thank goodness for the internet”. He encouraged Americans to get out and vote, and stressed the importance of voting for Gary Johnson who is paving the road for future candidates.

    Continue reading

    Magus 20th Anniversary and Williamson Retires

    On Saturday, local metaphysical store Magus Books & Herbs, celebrated 20 years in business and owner Roger Williamson retired.  Business partner Joseph Amara continues the Magus tradition and has plans for the next 20 years.  PNC-Minnesota interviewed Williamson to learn about the store’s past and what the future holds for him.

    Image

    Roger Williamson and Joseph Amara of Magus Books & Herbs

    Continue reading

    Twin Cities Pagan Pride this Saturday, September 8th

    Twin Cities Pagan Pride (TCPP) takes place this Saturday, September 8th, 2012 from 10am to 6pm. This is a free event, returning to Minnehaha Falls Park,  in the area around the band shell. The 2012 TCPP event will again focus on public education in an outdoor site that has tons of public walk through traffic.

    TCPP  has a full schedule, with alternating music and ritual offered by local groups, individuals, and area talent. TC Reclaiming is offering a labyrinth walk all day. A community drum jam is scheduled for the last half hour, beginning at 5.30pm.  New this year is a 15′  x 15′  tent central to the vendor area and adjacent to most of the organizational spaces that is being set aside specifically as a place to sit and have conversation.

    TCPP encourages  donations for their food shelf partner, charity donations, and for TCPP to support future events. volunteer help is always needed. Please stop by the information booth when you arrive and help out!

    Ubaka Hill at Women’s Drum Center – Interview

    Ubaka Hill

    Ubaka Hill is appearing in Minnesota this week, sponsored by the W0men’s Drum Center.

    CONCERT: Rhythms for the Trees: A Concert of Percussion, Poetry, Song and Vision

    Featuring Ubaka Hill and with Drumheart. Open to the general public Saturday, August 25, 2012

    Doors open at 6:00 p.m. for the Marketplace , Performance begins at 7:00 p.m.

    Jeanne d’Arc Auditorium, Whitby Hall, St. Catherine University 2004 Randolph Ave., St.Paul, MN

    Ubaka’s 2-day Workshop: Drumsong: the Art and Spirit of Drumming

    (for women and girls)

    Friday, August 24, 2012, 6:30-9:00 p.m. & Saturday, August 25, 9:30-1:30p.m.

    At Carondolet Center, 1890 Randolph Ave., St.Paul

    Register for workshop ($60) at www.brownpapertickets.com/event/258804

    Ubaka arrived Monday to prepare for a week of appearances around Minnesota, we talked by phone.

    What brings you to Minnesota?
    The Women’s Drum Center ( WDC ) is responsible for brings me out and setting up the workshops and concert, and setting up the Million Women Drummers Gathering 2013 , what we call, “Meet and Greets”. One of those will include a workshop but these are primarily to speak about the Million Women Drummers Gathering 2013 initiative/movement and how local and global communities and individuals can be a part of it.

    What is the Million Women Drummers Gathering 2013?
    It is a two tiered, tow levels, and two phased program. There is a gathering planned for October 11-13th, 2013. Between now and that date it is about raising our consciousness, and becoming more awake and aware that our wooden musical instruments are trees. As simple as that is, it is quite profound to become aware that we are participating in the deforestation of our old growth forests, our third world local woods, and of our wooded areas within the US and around the world. I have been drumming on the wooden drum for over thirty years. There was a point where I was not as awake and aware, and mindful of my participation indirectly, by being a consumer of drums, in the deforestation and the senseless cutting and disrespect of the trees, and the woods. In the sustainability of our future. Around 2007, something awakened inside of me. That awakening had to do with our unconscious consumption of wooden instruments. I am including all wooden instruments, from acoustic guitars, to upright bass’s; pianos, marimba, clarinets, flutes, violins, cellos harps, all the instruments. If we do not sustain the trees that our wooden instruments are made from, we do not have a future for those instruments that we love to play, and listen to, that we enjoy dancing to. We won’t be able to sustain the music of those trees and so won’t be able to sustain the folkloric traditions of our various cultures. Generations that will follow us, will also not have the trees or the wooden instruments for those trees to play.

    The Million Women Drummers Gathering 2013 initiative is essentially about creating a new mindful model as musicians and listeners, and players of wooden instruments. This call is coming from the leadership of women who love drums and who love trees. The Gathering in 2013 is a celebration of our new awake and aware selves, and our effort to create a new mindful model through planting trees, through having conversations about trees and creating a sustainable future, and to celebrate this by creating local rhythm circles including all players of wooden instruments while we plant trees and while we begin to create new technologies, ideas, and new approaches to a sustainable green policy for manufacturers, new traditions and new ways to approach the trees and the forest with gratitude and appreciation and the their replenishment.

    Continue reading

    Kirtan from the Heart – Gift to Sacred Harvest Festival

    A Kirtan in Sanskrit means  “praise, eulogy” . It originates in India and has spoken only forms and the more “liberal” Eastern Indian sung forms.  It is a call response form of expression of devotion, and is at its essence a ritual to the Gods.  It is from a world of 100′s of millions of Hindus and some forms of Buddhism, who celebrate their spirituality through the Kirtan. Alliances between these forms of spiritual Pagan expression are flourishing on the West Coast of the USA. Polytheists find more similarities in their worship than the vast cultural differences between Eastern practice and Western Pagans. Relatively new to Midwest Pagans, but becoming increasingly popular in “New Age” and Yoga based communities, the Kirtan movement is growing. Neo-Pagan connections to call and response, and voice based devotional ritual seems a logical extension in the range of Pagan practice.

    Sacred Harvest Festival guest, Yeshe Rabbit, brought this workshop as a taste of this form of expression. The workshop guided participants through, “… a magical progression to align body, mind, and spirit.”  I was drawn in and enthralled by the magic of this workshop.  The power of Rabbit’s voice was inspiring to festivants as the sound drifted through the village. The workshop participants were ecstatic afterwards, and bliss enveloped the village for the week. Jai Maa!  *

    Gift yourself seven minutes, close your eyes and join in the song as you hear the culmination of what was  over a 90 minute ritual Kirtan.

    Listen to Kali Mata – Kirtan From The Heart

    This slideshow requires JavaScript.

    Jai Maa : This is a call to the Divine Mother, ‘Maa,’ a singing of Her glory. Literally, ‘jai’ means ‘victory,’ although we often translate it as ‘hallelujah’ or ‘praises.’ Speaking ‘Jai Maa’ in puja (worship ceremony) is an affirmation of the Divine Mother’s blessings, a chant of gratitude for all Her gifts and the challenges She provides that help us grow spiritually.

    Nels Linde

    Andras Corban Arthen – Sacred Harvest Festival Guest – Interview

    I can listen to Andras Corban Arthen all day. He has a rich, low voice with the gentle cadence of caring. He has a lifetime of experience in the Pagan community, and the depth of perception and the wisdom of his words keeps you riveted.  He is presenting and performing all next week at Sacred Harvest Festival, near Geneva, Minnesota.  Advance registration closes today, gate registration is available during the event Aug. 6-12th.

    Andras Corban Arthen

    You are just back from Europe, what were you doing there?

    Andras: I go to Europe fairly often, since I have family and friends across the pond (I’m from Spain, originally), and a big part of my work is focused there. This trip served several purposes, the main one being related to a book I am writing, based on one of the presentations I will be doing at Sacred Harvest Festival (SHF) entitled The “Indians” of Old Europe. It looks at the cultures and spiritual practices that were originally called “Pagan” in the context of indigenous traditions from around the world. For over 35 years I’ve been searching for people in Europe who may be keeping alive the remnants of the old ethnic spiritual traditions of their countries, and have found some, both in Eastern and Western Europe, mostly in small, rural, out-of-the-way places where the old languages are still spoken. Most of them do not use the label “Pagan,” though their practices are not Christian and appear to be authentically very old. In some significant ways, they are quite different from what one typically finds in the modern pagan movement, and there are some important things that I think we could learn from them. When I first met these people I hadn’t been planning to publish a book, so before going further with this I needed to go back to touch base with them in person and ask for permission to write about them, their beliefs, and practices. I was able to do that with four of them, and in two of those cases wound up getting more information than I had before, so I’m pretty satisfied on that account.

    Continue reading

    Follow

    Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

    Join 2,447 other followers